Person Centered Care and Culture Change in an Adult Day Setting

held Wednesday, October 31, 2012

According to the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, there are currently between 1.4 and 3.8 million LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) Americans over the age of 65.  By 2030, this number is expected to increase to between 3.6 and 7.2 million LGBT Americans.

Older LGBT adults are at increasing risk for discrimination and isolation as they age. According to the LGBT Aging Project:

  • 75% of LGBT older adults are living alone.
  • 90% have no children.
  • 80% are single.

Given this propensity toward isolation, the training of healthcare professionals who are providing direct and indirect services to LGBT older adults in issues of cultural competence is important.

Adult Day Facilities are one example of an environment where LGBT older adults can thrive. A Grace Place Adult Care Center is a Richmond, Virginia adult day facility that took the initiative to train all of their staff members on issues related to the aging LGBT population. This initiative and effort to view each client as an individual is a hallmark of Person Centered Care and Culture Change. A Grace place has recently won Virginia Commonwealth University’s Department of Gerontology’s 2012 TIME Award (Theoretical Innovation and Maintaining Evidenced-Based Practice of Gerontology). This award was presented to A Grace Place Adult Care Center for its person centered culture and work with the LGBT research project and practice.

 

Intended Audience

This presentation is intended for all levels of healthcare professionals, aging services providers, and caregivers working with older adults.

Learning Objectives

Participants were offered practical strategies in readying healthcare professionals for building a Person-Centered culture. At the end of this presentation participants had:

  1. Increased understanding of Person-Centered Care and Culture Change in an Adult Day setting
  2. An introduction to Best Practices for healthcare professionals for integrating Person-Centered Care into their workforce
  3. An introduction to issues related to LGBT and Aging
  4. An introduction to the curriculum “A Caring Response: Giving Care to the LGBT Older Adult”

The Webinar

The live event was open to all and free for all.

PANELISTS

Lynne SewardLynne Seward, CTRS, is a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist with a 44 year direct care experience with 23 years management experience in human services and rehabilitation. She is well known for her energy, enthusiasm, focused advocacy and commitment to the needs and rights of persons with all abilities. Lynne’s experience includes program development and supervision of therapeutic programs serving a variety of ages and disabilities, including pediatrics, geriatrics, psychiatry, acute care, oncology, physical rehabilitation and community care. Populations served include persons with mental retardation, physical disabilities, mental illness and chronic illness, including dementia. She has developed Model Programs for dementia care and a community inclusion for adult s with intellectual disabilities.

Lynne is the CEO of A Grace Place Adult Care Center since 1987. A Grace place Adult Care Center provides supportive services to individuals and their caregivers who face the challenges of long-term care. Lynne had supported the expansion of agency staff from 4 to 95, the space from 2000 square-feet to 22,000 square feet, and the budget, from $24,000 to $3 million.

Lynne has received several awards including the “2008 Advancing the Common Good Award,” presented by United Way of Greater Richmond and Petersburg.

John (Jay) T. White, MS, completed his Master of Science in Gerontology from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2011 and is the Director of Professional and Community Development for the Department of Gerontology at VCU.

His background includes marketing, public relations, fundraising and organizational development within non-profit, educational and tourism-related organizations statewide. Jay has a BA in American History from Washington and Lee University and completed coursework for an MA in American Studies from the College of William & Mary. As a student and as a Gerontologist, Jay has authored and co-authored articles on topics ranging from Driving Cessation and Aging to Aging and Dementia Related Disorders. He has presented workshops on topics ranging from Nutrition and Aging to Cultural Competency among Healthcare Professionals.

Jay is the recipient of the Department of Gerontology’s 2011-2012 A.D. Williams Award for outstanding academic and professional performance and currently serves on numerous committees and Boards of Directors in support of the Department of Gerontology’s mission of “Improving Eldercare through Education.”

MODERATOR

Ayn WellefordE.  Ayn Welleford, PhD, His background includes marketing, public relations, fundraising and organizational development within non-profit, educational and tourism-related organizations statewide. Jay has a BA in American History from Washington and Lee University and completed coursework for an MA in American Studies from the College of William & Mary. As a student and as a Gerontologist, Jay has authored and co-authored articles on topics ranging from Driving Cessation and Aging to Aging and Dementia Related Disorders. He has presented workshops on topics ranging from Nutrition and Aging to Cultural Competency among Healthcare Professionals.

Jay is the recipient of the Department of Gerontology’s 2011-2012 A.D. Williams Award for outstanding academic and professional performance and currently serves on numerous committees and Boards of Directors in support of the Department of Gerontology’s mission of “Improving Eldercare through Education.”

The free webinar was co-sponsored by A Grace Place Adult Care CenterVirginia Commonwealth University’s Department of Gerontology and AlzPossible.

 

RECORDING

SLIDES